Tag Archives: Storytelling Podcast

My Story: Once Upon a Midnight Summer

midnightMy story today is set in the same way all parents tell stories to their children: With certain details omitted. What you want your children to know and what actually happened are two completely separate stories:

Of course, there is a flip side to this story: One of perpetual light in which the birthrate dropped a bit and people were less likely to have one-night stands when faced with a potential lover in the bright accusing light of day outside a bar. But I’ve never met someone from the opposite side of the world to tell me that story. And I really don’t want to tell my children about one-night stands so close to bedtime. Sex education should take place in the daylight.

Listen to Once Upon a Midnight Summer and tell me what you would change about your life if it was suddenly left in darkness.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

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My Story: A Brilliant Shade of Blue

blueskySometimes a story buzzes around in my head for a while before I am able to get it right — this is certainly the case with my story for today. I like to ask people what their first memories are of. For some people it’s just a fleeting impression and for others it is in amazing clarity with lots of details.

Christine’s first memory was a flood of orange juice. The cascading fall of it as it slipped out of her grasp and spread into a large puddle in front of the fridge, the pulpy bits lodging themselves between her toes. Why mom kept it in that glass pitcher, she never thought to ask. Her mother was the one who found Christine standing in the juice puddle, and she lifted her onto the sink counter to wash her ankles and toes with warm water.

Listen to A Brilliant Shade of Blue. And tell me what you would think about if you had the time to sit still with your own thoughts.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

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My story: Waking up with Strangers

My story may require an alarm clock.My story today has a happy ending.

A lot of my storytelling podcast posts don’t have a happy ending. I think that is part of the problem with stories — outside of certain genres (romance novels, fairy tales), most stories don’t have a happy ending. In Waking up with Strangers, however, the listener can be assured a happy ending — it may just be the rest of the story that they have a problem with.

Do you like happy endings to stories?

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

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My story: Woman with Eggs on Bus

My story title will make sense later.My story today has an unusual title, but stay with me.

This storytelling podcast explores that cast of background characters that seem to follow people in their daily lives. You see the same faces everywhere — on your morning commute, in line at the supermarket or even just walking along the street. In Woman with Eggs on Bus, we find that the background characters can lead some of the most interesting lives.

It occurs to Harriet that if she should die, she should probably leave her parents a note about the small plastic gnomes in the bottom drawer of her kitchen. The drawer wasn’t always devoted to gnomes – at one point it contained pots and pans. But then there was that Black Friday six years ago where she was trolling an online auction site and found a gross of them for sale.

Maybe this story will inspire you to reach out to those near strangers and say hello.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

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My story: The End of Jealousy

My story today is about jealousyMy story today is a bit more literary than usual.

In Othello, jealousy drives the main characters to acts of deceit, betrayal and violence. At the most extreme end of the spectrum, Iago is a man no one wants to become. In The End of Jealousy, Hannah regards Iago and the other characters as a pipe dream. She teaches the words of Othello over and over again, but can’t relate to the emotion behind them – jealousy is an emotion that only exists on paper.

Tomorrow her students will face the death of Desdemona and, eventually, of Othello, too. Hannah will do her best to answer their questions about motives, but she will end the day with the same bittersweet sense of triumph and failure as she does every year. In two days’ time, her students will be happy to return to reading Walden, or at least as happy as her students are to be reading anything, and Hannah will return her beloved copy of Othello to her nightstand shelf at home.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

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