Tag Archives: Parents

My Story: The Days Between Heartbeats

heartbeatMy story today echoes in silence – from children, from heartbeats and from the things that we do not say to the people we love.

At pickup time my sister is late. Or rather she is always late for our agreed-upon pickup time, but since she is consistently late, maybe she is actually on time. She looks tired despite the day off, so we do not talk.

What are you putting off saying to the people you love?

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

Play

My Story: Once Upon a Midnight Summer

midnightMy story today is set in the same way all parents tell stories to their children: With certain details omitted. What you want your children to know and what actually happened are two completely separate stories:

Of course, there is a flip side to this story: One of perpetual light in which the birthrate dropped a bit and people were less likely to have one-night stands when faced with a potential lover in the bright accusing light of day outside a bar. But I’ve never met someone from the opposite side of the world to tell me that story. And I really don’t want to tell my children about one-night stands so close to bedtime. Sex education should take place in the daylight.

Listen to Once Upon a Midnight Summer and tell me what you would change about your life if it was suddenly left in darkness.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

Play

My Story: When It’s Enough

My story today includes a few cups of tea.My story today is a little more personal than most of my others, because the mother in the story is based on my own mother — a woman I greatly respect, admire and love.

Children retain so many memories of their parents, but only in the role of parents. So few of us get to know the person outside of the parental role — the coworker, the friend, the person they were before becoming a parent.

My Mother was still waiting. Sitting at the kitchen table with a snack for us, or to take our wet jackets and umbrellas. Sometimes even in the same spot we had left her at breakfast. In my child’s mind she was always waiting for me there – her life at a standstill when I left the room. She is waiting now. For the rain to stop and her grandson to wake from his nap. And maybe even for me.

Listen to: When It’s Enough.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

 

Play

My Story: The Separated Life of Annie Good

No stories were harmed in the making of my story today. My story today focuses on the idea that we all have very different childhoods. But what if yours was so unusual, you had to hide it? In The Separated Life of Annie Good, we meet a woman who lies about the abnormality of her upbringing because the lie is easier to explain. Even to her boyfriend:

In her defense, she had spent the first four weeks of their relationship believing it would never work out between them. He was, after all, a calculus major. During their first date he had tried to start conversations with her about social economics and politics before they were able to settle on classic cinema as a mutually satisfying topic. By the time she had realized her miscalculation on his viability as a long-term boyfriend and started believing in his potential, it seemed too late to delve into childhood issues.

Abnormal is the new normal.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

subscribe to us on iTunes

Play

My story: I Should Have Peed Before I Left

My story advice includes when to use the bathroom.My story today includes a little motherly advice.

We are all familiar with motherly advice — that nagging (and usually correct) voice in our heads. In today’s story — I Should Have Peed Before I Left — we hear advice on common issues, like cleaning:

Alyssa was standing naked in her kitchen admiring her clean floors. She had mopped them when she first moved in, but this was her first real chance to give them a thorough scrubbing. Alyssa had woken earlier than usual that Sunday, and had scoured her new apartment. As the faux tile floor dried, Alyssa walked into her beige-on-white bathroom to freshen up before putting her clothes back on.

The wisdom of our parents spans across all topics, including love. We just have to learn to listen. Tell me your favorite bit of motherly advice in the comments section.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

subscribe to us on iTunes

Play