Category Archives: Story Podcast

My Story: Once Upon a Midnight Summer

midnightMy story today is set in the same way all parents tell stories to their children: With certain details omitted. What you want your children to know and what actually happened are two completely separate stories:

Of course, there is a flip side to this story: One of perpetual light in which the birthrate dropped a bit and people were less likely to have one-night stands when faced with a potential lover in the bright accusing light of day outside a bar. But I’ve never met someone from the opposite side of the world to tell me that story. And I really don’t want to tell my children about one-night stands so close to bedtime. Sex education should take place in the daylight.

Listen to Once Upon a Midnight Summer and tell me what you would change about your life if it was suddenly left in darkness.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

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My Story: A Brilliant Shade of Blue

blueskySometimes a story buzzes around in my head for a while before I am able to get it right — this is certainly the case with my story for today. I like to ask people what their first memories are of. For some people it’s just a fleeting impression and for others it is in amazing clarity with lots of details.

Christine’s first memory was a flood of orange juice. The cascading fall of it as it slipped out of her grasp and spread into a large puddle in front of the fridge, the pulpy bits lodging themselves between her toes. Why mom kept it in that glass pitcher, she never thought to ask. Her mother was the one who found Christine standing in the juice puddle, and she lifted her onto the sink counter to wash her ankles and toes with warm water.

Listen to A Brilliant Shade of Blue. And tell me what you would think about if you had the time to sit still with your own thoughts.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

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My Story: When It’s Enough

My story today includes a few cups of tea.My story today is a little more personal than most of my others, because the mother in the story is based on my own mother — a woman I greatly respect, admire and love.

Children retain so many memories of their parents, but only in the role of parents. So few of us get to know the person outside of the parental role — the coworker, the friend, the person they were before becoming a parent.

My Mother was still waiting. Sitting at the kitchen table with a snack for us, or to take our wet jackets and umbrellas. Sometimes even in the same spot we had left her at breakfast. In my child’s mind she was always waiting for me there – her life at a standstill when I left the room. She is waiting now. For the rain to stop and her grandson to wake from his nap. And maybe even for me.

Listen to: When It’s Enough.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

 

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My Story: The Virus Is the Cure

My story today features a beautiful virus.A familiar, soft buzzing noise is at the heart of my story.

It’s amazing how that little buzz/ping/beep has integrated into our days. There is the phantom buzz where you think you heard your phone, but aren’t sure. And there is even the buzz check where you haven’t heard a buzz in so long, you have to check your battery.

But what if there was just silence? Imagine that your phone stopped talking to you.

There was once a time when he had to corral people and demand they stack their phones in the center of the conference table just to keep their attention for the 15-minute meeting. He thought of how they would look now – a tower of empty boxes.

Listen to: The Virus Is the Cure.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

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My Story: The Separated Life of Annie Good

No stories were harmed in the making of my story today. My story today focuses on the idea that we all have very different childhoods. But what if yours was so unusual, you had to hide it? In The Separated Life of Annie Good, we meet a woman who lies about the abnormality of her upbringing because the lie is easier to explain. Even to her boyfriend:

In her defense, she had spent the first four weeks of their relationship believing it would never work out between them. He was, after all, a calculus major. During their first date he had tried to start conversations with her about social economics and politics before they were able to settle on classic cinema as a mutually satisfying topic. By the time she had realized her miscalculation on his viability as a long-term boyfriend and started believing in his potential, it seemed too late to delve into childhood issues.

Abnormal is the new normal.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

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