Monthly Archives: September 2013

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Audio commentary: Her Mother’s Last Words

All audio commentary is actually written. Haha.Today’s audio commentary is a little personal. You see, I write my son letters. Sometimes it is hard, because I don’t know if he will ever want to read them. Other times, I fear what he will think of me when he does read them. But, I write them anyway, in the hopes he will understand how much I truly love him.

One day, while writing him, I started to wonder what it would be like if these letters were the only interaction he ever had with me and how that would affect him. Boom — story time.

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My story: Her Mother’s Last Words

My story today is about last words.My story today is about last words.

People’s last words are the ones that stay with us — no matter if that person is a celebrity, a close friend or a parent. It’s really hard for parents to let their children grow up and grow away from them. Parents never know which of their words will have staying power in their children’s lives. In Her Mother’s Last Words, we see how a mother’s words influence her daughter’s daily life.

I’m afraid, my little Rebecca, that you’ll find 13 to be a bittersweet age. It’s the one in which little girls feel all the horrible things they can do and are upset over all the exciting – yet equally horrible things they can’t do yet.

We all want our final words to be memorable, but we always leave them to the last minute. If you had to plan out your final words now, what would you say? Leave your last words in the comments.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

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Audio Commentary: The Weight of Our Objects

Here is some audio commentary that you can read about.In today’s audio commentary on the podcast, I am going to make a confession: I watch a lot of those home cleaning television shows. Some of them intrigue me. Others (like Hoarders), scare me. They frighten me into getting rid of excess stuff and challenge my reasons for holding onto things that I don’t need anymore. I guess that is a good thing.

What scares me more than the people who hoard their stuff, is the people who enable them. Why does that happen? Is it love? Devotion? Passive-aggressive acceptance? Shouldn’t we challenge the ones we love when they display behaviors that aren’t typical – even when it is hard to do?

So now it is your turn to confess: What are you still holding onto?

Note to my husband: Please don’t let me hold onto things I don’t need.

For additional audio commentary on the podcast’s stories, visit us here.

My story: The Weight of Our Objects

My story today is about too much stuff.My story today is about the longstanding battle that goes on in so many homes.

Every day, men and woman battled for home territory with their personal knickknacks. In The Weight of Our Objects, Christina thinks of the house as “hers,” except for the contents of Edgar’s rooms — those are definitely “his.”

She gave him his room and kept out of it, decorating the rest of their home in mottled greens and soft blues. She kept out of his den, respecting his privacy – never entering to clean or nag about chores or pry. Never asking him about why he locked the door.

Do you have a room of your own in your house? Tell me about it in the comments.

That’s my story. Tell me one of yours.

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Audio commentary: Everyday Lives

I’d like to preempt the “audio commentary” on this story for a brief science lesson on hyperthymesia.

Hyperthymesia is a rare condition that causes people to remember every day of their lives. Think about the mundane details of your day: Reading email, watching TV, cleaning the house, talking with telemarketers. Would you want to remember it all?

If it is audio commentary, then why do I have to read it?And that is where the idea from this story came from: I was thinking about all the little moments in my life that I regularly forget. And I’m glad that I forget them, as I am sure they would just clog up my brain.

Leave me a comment on something in your life that you always forget (hopefully, it’s not an important anniversary or birthday!)

For additional audio commentary on the podcast’s stories, visit us here.